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June 26, 2008

Comments

Juli

A lot of people complain about the DRM found on music bought at the iTunes Music Store. This is quite natural, since iTunes is by far the biggest supplier of music files, and the only legal place to buy files that play on iPods. iTunes only allows you to upload the files to a few iPods, burn them to a few CDs, and play them on a few computers. And you can only upload files to YOUR iPods; If someone else's iPod is set to play music from their account, the only way to put music from YOUR account into their iPod is to re-set that iPod to your account (which requires erasing all the music in it). And if you want to get music DOWN from an iPod, then this is basically impossible. So you need converter which help you to solve such drm-problem.

One such program is Melodycan. All you have to do is open it, adjust the settings if you want, pick a back-up folder and start the conversion (maximum summary converting speed is 50x ). Nothing could be easier. If you have the latest version of this program and the right version of iTunes, though, you`ll haven`t any problems.

What about iTunes-purchased videos? I heared that the only way to break the DRM on videos you buy at the iTunes Music Store (such as movies, music videos, and TV shows) is to use Melodycan. Essentially, it "watches" the movies you bought (if your computer is slow, it will go slower than real time, to make sure it captures every frame and synchs the sound properly), and records them into a new file that is not DRM'ed. You can change the settings so as to choose the format and properties (resolution, framerate, bitrate, compression algorithm) of the new file. I tried free trial and like conversion speed and quality.

William

Juli stated:

"A lot of people complain about the DRM found on music bought at the iTunes Music Store. This is quite natural, since iTunes is by far the biggest supplier of music files, and the only legal place to buy files that play on iPods. iTunes only allows you to upload the files to a few iPods, burn them to a few CDs, and play them on a few computers. And you can only upload files to YOUR iPods; If someone else's iPod is set to play music from their account, the only way to put music from YOUR account into their iPod is to re-set that iPod to your account (which requires erasing all the music in it)."

There are several errors in these statements. We all love to hate DRM, and iTunes for using it, but be accurate lest you lose your credibility.

Setting aside those tracks on iTunes that do not include DRM (iTunes Plus), one can upload files to as many iPods as you wish--not merely "a few". You can also have files from several different accounts (say yours and a friend's) as long as the machine iTunes is run on is authorized to play music from all the accounts. Each account can have up to 5 machines authorized at any given time. You have to copy the tracks to each other's computer, but the iPod can playback music from several accounts without erasing anything.

You can burn songs to as many CDs as you wish, again not merely "a few". You cannot burn the exact same playlist more that a few times, but simply add or subtract a song to change the playlist and keep going. There is no "burn count" or limit per song.

Would I like to have DRM out of the picture--yes. But Apple's implementation is the least invasive of the systems I have seen and it is there because the major labels demand it. They (the labels) are even trying to force iTunes to raise/change their pricing structure by providing non-DRM music through other online resellers.

I enjoy the flexibility and quality of Magnatune's offerings, but I don't hesitate to buy iTunes music either. Whatever works for you, just keep the facts straight.

Regards.

Vinh

I was about to sign up to Magnatunes' paid membership tonight until I stumbled upon the how-to-download-to-Itunes pages, which are very confusing and loaded with tech jargon that I have NO idea what the author was talking about.

I decide NOT to pay for Magnatunes, simply because I don't know how to download albums directly from my Apple Ipod Touch online.

Why don't you guys speak common English, so that people who don't live in your tech ivory tower can simply click one icon on their Ipod Touch to sign up for their paid membership and download immediately?!

I don't want to pay you people money to feel like a frustrated "fool" myself!

Improve your download function for your Ipod app, make it easier and simplier for us non-techies who live in the real world to utilize your service at ease, can you, please?

John from Magnatune

Vinh: to download music on Magnatune, you simply click the "download" button and choose your format.

The feature you're referring to, that you find confusing, is one used by more technical people and isn't the standard way.

-john

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